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File:Uranian rings PIA01977 modest.jpg


English: Voyager 2 picture of Uranus' rings taken on January 22, 1986, from a distance of 2.52 million kilometers. Nine rings are visible in this image, a 15-second exposure through a clear filter. The most prominent and outermost of the nine, called epsilon, is seen at top. The next three in toward Uranus — called delta, gamma and eta — are much fainter and more narrow than the epsilon ring. Then come the beta and alpha rings and finally the innermost grouping, known simply as the 4, 5 and 6 rings. The last three are very faint and are at the limit of detection for the Voyager camera. The bright dots are imperfections on the camera detector. The resolution scale is approximately 50 km (30 mi).
Date 22 January 1986
Source Originally uploaded to en:wikipedia by Kwamikagami ( talk • contribs), 20:03, 22 December 2005 (UTC) ( log).
Author NASA
( Reusing this file)
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