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File:Macs killing cancer cell.jpg


Description [Part of a] six-step sequence of the death of a cancer cell. A cancer cell has migrated through the holes of a matrix coated membrane from the top to the bottom, simulating natural migration of a invading cancer cell between, and sometimes through, the vascular endothelium. Notice the spikes or pseudopodia that are characteristic of an invading cancer cell (1). A buffy coat containing red blood cells, lymphocytes and macrophages is added to the bottom of the membrane. A group of macrophages identify the cancer cell as foreign matter and start to stick to the cancer cell, which still has its spikes (2). Shown: Macrophages begin to fuse with, and inject its toxins into, the cancer cell. The cell starts rounding up and loses its spikes (3). As the macrophage cell becomes smooth (4). The cancer cell appears lumpy in the last stage before it dies. These lumps are actually the macrophages fused within the cancer cell (5). The cancer cell then loses its morphology, shrinks up and dies (6). Photo magnification: 3: x8,000 Type: B & W print
Date Date Created: October 1988
Source Image and description: Dr. Raowf Guirguis. National Cancer Institute
Author Susan Arnold (photographer)
( Reusing this file)
Public domain This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that person’s official duties under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code. See Copyright.

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