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FrameBreaking-1812.jpg(419 × 402 pixels, file size: 66 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)


English: Frame-breakers, or Luddites, smashing a loom. Machine-breaking was criminalized by the Parliament of the United Kingdom as early as 1721, the penalty being penal transportation, but as a result of continued opposition to mechanisation the Frame-Breaking Act 1812 made the death penalty available: see " Criminal damage in English law".
Date 1812; originally uploaded to en.wikipedia on 27 May 2008.
Source Original unknown, this version from Transferred from en.wikipedia by Jacklee using CommonsHelper.
Author Unknown; original uploader was Rodhullandemu at en.wikipedia.
( Reusing this file)

PD-OLD; this image is in the public domain due to its age.

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