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File:Ceres Rotation.jpg


NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took these images of the asteroid 1 Ceres over a 2-hour and 20-minute span, the time it takes the Texas-sized object to complete one quarter of a rotation. One day on Ceres lasts 9 hours. The bright spot that appears in each image is a mystery. It is brighter than its surroundings. Yet it is still very dark, reflecting only a small portion of the sunlight that shines on it.

Esperanto: La Hubble-teleskopo de NASA fotis Cereson dum 140 minutoj, proksimume kvarona rotacio de la planedeto. La relative brila makulo, efektive ankaŭ ĝi tre malhela, restas enigma.
Date Image released 2005 September 7
Source NASA:
Author NASA, ESA, J. Parker (Southwest Research Institute), P. Thomas (Cornell University), and L. McFadden (University of Maryland, College Park)
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Hubble 01.jpg
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