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File:Tetragrammaton benediction.png

Tetragrammaton_benediction.png(550 × 210 pixels, file size: 81 KB, MIME type: image/png)

Portion of writing on silver scroll with the "Priestly Benediction" (Numbers 6:24-26) in which the tetragrammaton can be seen. Earliest depiction of the tetragrammaton - dated around 600 B.C.E.

"May YHWH bless you and keep you; may YHWH cause his face to shine upon you and be gracious to you; may YHWH lift up his countenance upon you and grant you peace."

In Hebrew:

יברכך יהוה וישמרך

יאר יהוה פניו אליך ויחנך

ישא יהוה פניו אליך וישם לך שלום

Found in 1979 in Jerusalem.

As reported in The Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research by Dr. Gabriel Barkay, the archaeologist at Bar-Ilan University in Israel who discovered the artifacts, and collaborators associated with Southern California's West Semitic Research Project. The project leader is Dr. Bruce Zuckerman, a professor of Semitic languages at U.S.C., who worked with Dr. Marilyn J. Lundberg, a Hebrew Bible specialist with the project, and Dr. Andrew G. Vaughn, a biblical historian at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minn.

Date 2008, 28th May
Source English Wikipedia here
Author pvasiliadis

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