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Artist Louis Schultze
Description Dred Scott (1795 – 1858), plaintiff in the infamous Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857) case at the Supreme Court of the United States. Painted by Louis Schultze [1820 (Germany)-1900 (Missouri?)] , commissioned by a "group of Negro citizens" and presented to the Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis, in 1888.
Date 1888
Missouri History Museum
Notes This is not a contemporary painting. It was done decades after his death, presumably based on an 1857 photo seen here.
Source/Photographer Original image New source
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Image Credit: Digital image ©1998 Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis


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