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English: George V and his Prime Ministers at the 1926 Imperial Conference. The conference was the sixth Imperial Conference held amongst the Prime Ministers of the dominions of the British Empire. It was held in London from 19 October to 22 November 1926. It was notable as the conference that produced the Balfour Declaration, which established the principle that the dominions are all equal in status, and not subordinate to the United Kingdom.

George V (seated, centre) with Rt. Hon. Stanley Baldwin (seated left), Rt. Hon. W.L. Mackenzie King (seated, right). Standing Rt. Hon. Walter Stanley Monroe, Rt. Hon. Gordon Coates, Rt. Hon. Stanley Bruce, Rt. Hon. J. B. M. Hertzog and W.T. Cosgrave.

Date 4 November 1926
Library and Archives Canada.JPG This image is available from Library and Archives Canada under the reproduction reference number C-000964 and under the MIKAN ID number 3362798

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Author Unknown

LAC does not have any information as to the identity of the photographer, so the {{ PD-UK-unknown}} license tag is used. If the image were taken on behalf of the United Kingdom government, it would also be public domain as per {{ PD-UKGov}}.

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Public domain This Canadian work is in the public domain in Canada because its copyright has expired due to one of the following:
1. it was subject to Crown copyright and was first published more than 50 years ago, or

it was not subject to Crown copyright, and

2. it is a photograph that was created prior to January 1, 1949, or
3. the creator died more than 50 years ago.
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